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Lamkin

No: 93; variant: 93D

  1. SAID the lord to his lady, Beware of Rankin; For I am going to England, to wait on the king.
  2. ‘No fears, no fears,’ said the lady, said she, ‘For the doors shall be bolted, and the windows pindee.
  3. ‘Go bar all the windows, both outside and in; Don’t leave a window open, to let Bold Rankin in.’
  4. She has barred all the windows, both outside and in; But she left one of them open, to let Bold Rankin in.
  5. ‘O where is the master of this house?’ said Bold Rankin; ‘He’s up in Old England.’ said the false nurse to him.
  6. ‘O where is the mistress of this house?’ said Bold Rankin; ‘She’s up in the chamber sleeping,’ said the false nurse to him.
  7. ‘O how shall we get her down?’ said Bold Rankin; ‘By piercing the baby,’ said the false nurse to him.
  8. ‘Go please the baby, nursy, go please it with a bell;’ ‘It will not be pleased, madam, till you come down yoursel.’
  9. ‘How can I come down stairs, so late into the night, Without coal or candle, to shew me the light?
  10. ‘There is a silver bolt lies on the chest-head; Give it to the baby, give it sweet milk and bread.’
  11. She rammed the silver bolt up the baby’s nose, Till the blood it came trinkling down the baby’s fine clothes.
  12. ‘Go please the baby, nursie, go please it with the bell:’ ‘It will not please, madam, till you come down yoursel.
  13. ‘It will neither please with breast-milk, nor yet with pap; But I pray, loving lady, Come and roll it in your lap.’
  14. The first step she stepit, she steppit on a stone; And the next step she stepit, she met Bold Rankin.
  15. ‘O rankin, O Rankin, spare me till twelve o’clock, And I will give you as many guineas as you can carry on your back.’
  16. ‘What care I for as many guineas as seeds into a sack, When I cannot keep my hands off your lily-white neck?’
  17. ‘O will I kill her, nursie, or let her abee?’ ‘O kill her,’ said the false nurse, ‘She was never good to me.’
  18. ‘Go scour the bason, lady, both outside and in, To hold your mother’s heart’s blood, sprung from a noble kin.’
  19. ‘To hold my mother’s heart’s blood would make my heart full woe; O rather kill me, Rankin, and let my mother go.’
  20. ‘Go scour the bason, servants, both outside and in, To hold your lady’s heart’s blood, sprung from a noble kin.’
  21. ‘To hold my lady’s heart’s blood would make my heart full woe; O rather kill me, Rankin, and let my lady go.’
  22. ‘Go scour the bason, nursy, both outside and in, To hold your lady’s heart’s blood, sprung from a noble kin.’
  23. ‘To hold my lady’s heart’s blood would make my heart full glad; Ram in the knife, Bold Rankin, and gar the blood to shed.
  24. ‘She’s none of my comrades, she’s none of my kin; Ram in the knife, Bold Rankin, and gar the blood rin.’
  25. ‘O will I kill her, nursy, or let her abee?’ ‘O kill her,’ said the false nurse, ‘She was never good to me.’
  26. ‘I wish my wife and family may be all well at home; For the silver buttons of my coat they will not stay on.’
  27. As Betsy was looking oer her window so high, She saw her dear father come riding by.
  28. ‘O father, dear father, don’t put the blame on me It was false nurse and Rankin that killed your lady.’
  29. O wasn’t that an awful sight, when he came to the stair, To see his fairest lady lie bleeding there!
  30. The false nurse was burnt on the mountain hill-head, And Rankin was boiled in a pot full of lead.