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The King’s Dochter Lady Jean

No: 52; variant: 52C

  1. AS Annie sat into her bower, A thought came in her head, That she would gang to gude greenwood, Across the flowery mead.
  2. She hadna pu’d a flower, a flower, Nor broken a branch but twa, Till by it came a gentle squire, Says, Lady, come awa.
  3. There’s nane that comes to gude greenwood But pays to me a tein, And I maun hae your maidenhead, Or than your mantle green.
  4. ‘My mantle’s o the finest silk, Anither I can spin; But gin you take my maidenhead, The like I’ll never fin.’
  5. He’s taen her by the milk-white hand, And by the grass-green sleeve, There laid her low in gude greenwood, And at her spierd nae leave.
  6. When he had got his wills o her, His wills as he had taen, She said, If you rightly knew my birth, Ye’d better letten alane.
  7. ‘Is your father a lord o might? Or baron o high degree? Or what race are ye sprung frae, That I should lat ye be?’
  8. ‘O I am Castle Ha’s daughter, O birth and high degree, And if he knows what ye hae done, He’ll hang you on a tree.’
  9. ‘If ye be Castle Ha’s daughter, This day I am undone; If ye be Castle Ha’s daughter, I am his only son.’
  10. ‘Ye lie, ye lie, ye jelly hind squire, Sae loud as I hear you lie, Castle Ha, he has but ae dear son, And he is far beyond the sea.’
  11. ‘O I am Castle Ha’s dear son, A word I dinna lie; Yes, I am Castle Ha’s dear son, And new come oer the sea.
  12. '’Twas yesterday, that fatal day, That I did cross the faem; I wish my bonny ship had sunk, And I had neer come hame.’
  13. Then dowie, dowie, raise she up, And dowie came she hame, And stripped aff her silk mantle, And then to bed she’s gane.
  14. Then in it came her mother dear, And she steps in the fleer: ‘Win up, win up, now fair Annie, What makes your lying here?’
  15. ‘This morning fair, as I went out, Near by yon castle wa, Great and heavy was the stane That on my foot did fa.’
  16. ‘Hae I nae ha’s, hae I nae bowers, Towers, or mony a town? Will not these cure your bonny foot, Gar you gae hale and soun?’
  17. ‘Ye hae ha’s, and ye hae bowers, And towers, and mony a town, But nought will cure my bonny foot, Gar me gang hale and soun.’
  18. Then in it came her father dear, And he trips in the fleer: ‘Win up, win up, now fair Annie, What makes your lying here?’
  19. ‘This morning fair, as I went out, Near by yon castle wa, Great and heavy was the stane That on my foot did fa.’
  20. ‘Hae I nae ha’s, hae I nae bowers, And towers, and mony a town? Will not these cure your bonny foot, Gar you gang hale and soun?’
  21. ‘O ye hae ha’s, and ye hae bowers, And towers, and mony a town, But nought will cure my bonny foot, Gar me gang hale and soun.’
  22. Then in it came her sister Grace; As she steps in the fleer, ‘Win up, win up, now fair Annie, What makes your lying here?
  23. ‘Win up, and see your ae brother, That’s new come ower the sea;’ ‘Ohon, alas!’ says fair Annie, ‘He spake ower soon wi me.’
  24. To her room her brother’s gane, Stroked back her yellow hair, To her lips his ain did press, But words spake never mair.