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The Broom of Cowdenknows

No: 217; variant: 217J

  1. IT was a dark and a misty night, . . . . And by came a troop o gentlemen, Said, Lassie, shew me the way.
  2. ‘Oh well ken I by your silk mantle, And by your grass-green sleeve, That you are the maid of the Cowdenknows, And may well seem to be.’
  3. ‘I’m nae the maid of the Cowdenknows, Nor ever think to be; I am but ane of her hirewomen, Rides aft in her companie.
  4. ‘Oh well do I ken by your milk-white steed, And by your merry winking ee, That you are the laird of Lochinvar, And may well seem to be.’
  5. ‘I’m nae the laird of Lochinvar, Nor may well seem to be; But I am one of his merry young men, And am oft in his companie.’
  6. ‘The tod was among your sheep, father, You may look forth and see; And before he had taen tha lamb he’s taen I had rather he had taen three.’
  7. When twenty weeks were come and gane, Twenty weeks and three, The lassie she turned pale and wan . . . .
  8. . . . . And was caain out her father’s kye, When by came a troop of gentlemen, Were riding along the way.
  9. ‘Fair may it fa thee, weel-fa’rt may! Wha’s aught the bairn ye’re wi?’ ‘O I hae a husband o my ain, To father my bairn te.’
  10. ‘You lie, you lie, you weel-far’d may, Sae loud ‘s I hear you lie! Do you mind the dark and the misty night I was in the bught wi thee?’
  11. ‘Oh well do I ken by your milk-white steed, And by your merry winkin ee, That you are the laird of Lochinvar, That was in the bught wi me.’