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Archie o Cawfield

No: 188; variant: 188F

  1. AS I walked out one morning in May, Just before the break of day, I heard two brothers a making their moan, And I listened a while to what they did say. I heard, etc.
  2. ‘We have a brother in prison,’ said they, ‘Oh in prison lieth he! If we had but ten men just like ourselves, The prisoner we would soon set free.’
  3. ‘Oh, no, no, no!’ Bold Dickie said he, ‘Oh no, no, no, that never can be! For forty men is full little enough And I for to ride in their companie.
  4. ‘Ten to hold the horses in, Ten to guard the city about, Ten for to stand at the prison-door, And ten to fetch poor Archer out.’
  5. They mounted their horses, and so rode they, Who but they so merrilie! They rode till they came to a broad river’s side, And there they alighted so manfullie.
  6. They mounted their horses, and so swam they, Who but they so merrilie! They swam till they came to the other side, And there they alighted so manfullie.
  7. They mounted their horses, and so rode they, Who but they so merrilie! They rode till they came to that prison-door, And then they alighted so manfullie.
  8. . . . . . . . . ‘For I have forty men in my companie, And I have come to set you free.’
  9. ‘Oh no, no, no!’ poor Archer says he, ‘Oh no, no, no, that never can be! For I have forty pounds of good Spanish iron Betwixt my ankle and my knee.’
  10. Bold Dickie broke lock, Bold Dickie broke key, Bold Dickie broke everything that he could see; He took poor Archer under one arm, And carried him out so manfullie.
  11. They mounted their horses, and so rode they, Who but they so merrilie! They rode till they came to that broad river’s side, And there they alighted so manfullie.
  12. ‘Bold Dickie, Bold Dickie,’ poor Archer says he, ‘Take my love home to my wife and children three; For my horse grows lame, he cannot swim, And here I see that I must die.’
  13. They shifted their horses, and so swam they, Who but they so merrilie! They swam till they came to the other side, And there they alighted so manfullie.
  14. ‘Bold Dickie, Bold Dickie,’ poor Archer says he, ‘Look you yonder there and see; For the high-sheriff he is a coming, With an hundred men in his companie.’
  15. ‘Bold Dickie, Bold Dickie,’ High-sheriff said he, ‘You’re the damndest rascal that ever I see! Go bring me back the iron you’ve stole, And I will set the prisoner free.’
  16. ‘Oh no, no, no!’ Bold Dickie said he, ‘Oh no, no, no, that never can be! For the iron ‘twill do to shoe the horses, The blacksmith rides in our companie.’
  17. ‘Bold Dickie, Bold Dickie,’ High-sheriff says he, ‘You’re the damndest rascal that ever I see!’ ‘I thank ye for nothing,’ Bold Dickie says he, ‘And you’re a damned fool for following me.’